Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships (Nonviolent Communication Guides)


Product Description

What is Violent Communication?
 
If “violent” means acting in ways that result in hurt or harm, then much of how we communicate—judging others, bullying, having racial bias, blaming, finger pointing, discriminating, speaking without listening, criticizing others or ourselves, name-calling, reacting when angry, using political rhetoric, being defensive or judging who’s “good/bad” or what’s “right/wrong” with people—could indeed be called “violent communication.”
 
What is Nonviolent Communication?
 
Nonviolent Communication is the integration of four things:
 
• Consciousness: a set of principles that support living a life of compassion, collaboration, courage, and authenticity
 
• Language: understanding how words contribute to connection or distance
 
• Communication: knowing how to ask for what we want, how to hear others even in disagreement, and how to move toward solutions that work for all
 
• Means of influence: sharing “power with others” rather than using “power over others”
 
Nonviolent Communication serves our desire to do three things:
 
• Increase our ability to live with choice, meaning, and connection
 
• Connect empathically with self and others to have more satisfying relationships
 
• Sharing of resources so everyone is able to benefit

Price: $10.98
  • Nonviolent Communication A Language of Life 3rd Edition Life Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships

3 thoughts on “Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships (Nonviolent Communication Guides)

  1. 3 of 3 people found the following review helpful

    4.0 out of 5 stars
    not just another “Self Help” book, October 13, 2017

    By Ron Housley (Buxton, Maine) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This review is from: Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships (Nonviolent Communication Guides) (Kindle Edition)

    Non-Violent Communication: A Language of Life
    Marshall Rosenberg 3rd ed ©2015 (1st ed ©1999)

    a short BOOK REPORT by Ron Housley

    I guess this whole NVC thing came to a head for me during the #TakeTheKnee phenomenon, when tempers were high, when emotionalism ruled the day, and when the entire country was being trashed because people thought kneeling was an appropriate way to protest how long it was taking America to climb out of its historical racism.

    “You’re bad!” “No, YOU’RE bad! And on it went

    Entire moral denunciations were leveled, without so much as a pretense at uncovering the “other” side’s basic position; I was even indirectly denounced. If ever there was an opportunity for NVC (Non-Violent Communication) to come to the rescue, this was it. But don’t hold your breath — because NVC is no more on people’s radar than is the moral superiority of capitalism.

    Sometimes, as we course through our lives, just one or two ideas take center stage for us. For me, the center stage idea was a view of life extoling reason, fairness, individualism and ultimately capitalism. But in a veritable sea of Violent Communication, I have succeeded in angering or disappointing more people than I have in winning them over to my own camp.

    And I am certain that my failure is not due to any shortcomings of the camp itself; but, rather, it is due to the Violent Communicating that characterizes the culture I have immersed myself in all these years.

    And now comes the antidote: Non-Violent Communication.

    I am tempted to summarize Rosenberg’s model for you here; but better that you investigate it individually, if you find its promises of interest. It saddens me to realize that so many areas of my own life could have been vastly more fulfilling had I stumbled upon Rosenberg’s model sooner; but better late than never.

    And if you don’t want to take the time to dig into what, on the surface, sounds like just one more “self-help” book, there is an abundance of YouTube workshops to give you a look under the hood.

    When I did my own look under the hood, I found one problem: Rosenberg had put a hodge-podge of “human needs” at the core of his approach, the formulation of which I found troubling. But then I discovered (THANK YOU Jean Moroney) a way to re-frame Rosenberg’s “needs” into “universal human values,” which did resonate with my overview of how we are all motivated.

    At the base of Rosenberg’s message, for me, is that in our dealings with others we tend to respond “too aggressively” or “too defensively;” and by so doing, we diminish our capacity for connection and for having a meaningful conversation. Hence — all the many conversations that go nowhere; all the conversations that result in feelings of disgust and/or personal hurt; all the conversations which might have actually solved a problem but which in reality made things worse.

    It was inevitable that, in time, I would recognize my own destructive habit of reflexively (not thinking it through) interpreting and criticizing people’s statements, infusing my input with implied wrongness — entirely missing Rosenberg’s contention that doing so is “a tragic expression of an unmet need (of my own).”

    The trick (one of the tricks) for me is to recognize “need” (or “value”) in statements that don’t overtly express any need. It’s not easy and it takes relentless focusing, but in the end I’m sensing that Rosenberg’s way seems to bring about better outcomes.

    So I’ll just say this: I was a big skeptic when I first learned about Marshall Rosenberg. Now I have seen enough examples of his approach in action to believe in its value and in its potential relevance to my own life. But, I’m not yet sure how much study and practice will be required to make “the Rosenberg way” into a regular feature of my own life. It definitely appears to be worth some effort.

  2. 137 of 142 people found the following review helpful

    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If you grew up in a dysfunctional family like I did, May 19, 2016

    By JessicaG (CA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This review is from: Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships (Nonviolent Communication Guides) (Paperback)

    This book has made all of my relationships more manageable. If you grew up in a dysfunctional family like I did, where communication usually happened in the form of guilt trips and passive aggression, this book can change your life. As soon as I started applying concepts like observing without judgment, communicating my needs and my feelings openly and honestly, asking for what would add joy to my life, and not taking ownership for other people’s feelings or responses to me, I noticed a change in how people in my life responded to me and my requests. People began to seem more open to hearing me, and normal every day conflicts can be addressed without people getting escalated.

  3. 10 of 10 people found the following review helpful

    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good communication message, but tone deaf to women, December 28, 2017

    By Jennifer D.

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This review is from: Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships (Nonviolent Communication Guides) (Paperback)

    I read this on a recommendation as one of my friend’s favorite books. I agree it has beautiful truths and words to live by. However, and perhaps ironically, this book is tone deaf to women in a way that caused me to cringe every 10 pages or so, which does detract from the message. I do recommend the ideals in this book, if only to ask, “has anyone read something similar that doesn’t portray women in this pathetic light?”

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